"Now I get what you are saying”“You can be the mortar” Podcast to get there… together Let’s not write people off just yet

"Now I get what you are saying”

Husband and wife supporting two different parties: how can that work? John and Lori Chesser share about their 30 years developing a dialogue of life

“You can be the mortar”

“Those who humble themselves will be exalted” … but a show of false humility would not have gotten me anywhere

Podcast to get there… together

A new pair of podcasters communicate their message of unity

Let’s not write people off just yet

What does it mean to call someone “toxic?”

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Current Issue

Forming a “civil” conscience
How to make space for differing political views

Considering all that is at stake in the looming 2020 U.S. elections, voters face a serious dilemma: whom to vote for when neither side offers policies compatible with the whole range of values promoted by the Gospel? With such opposing views and little room for reasonable discussion that might lead to mutual understanding and respect, we’re left with what seems like an insurmountable conflict. There is dire need for leadership at the highest level that can cut through the divisive rhetoric and offer a concerted, effective response to the many crises crippling the nation today: the Covid-19 pandemic and racial reckoning, just to name a few. Amid the plethora of news polls, social media and campaign tactics used to discredit the opposing candidate, the search for truth now takes gargantuan effort. Three ethicists offer a path that steers away from polarizing diatribes, and real-life experiences show that through dialogue, diversity of perspectives can be a source of growth.

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John and Lori Chesser, a couple from Des Moines, Iowa, share about their 30 years developing a dialogue of life

A show of false humility would not have gotten me anywhere

A new pair of podcasters communicate their message of unity

What does it mean to call someone “toxic?”